Odessa Potemkin-Stairs

De oorlog in Oekraïne vecht ook tegen of voor een taal. Vladimir Poetin voerde de verdediging van de ‘Russisch sprekenden’ aan ter rechtvaardiging voor een campagne van culturele en politieke overheersing, aldus Amelia Glaser, Associate Professor for Russian and Comparative Literature aan U.C. San Diego USA. In een artikel op de Kremlin-website van vorig jaar juli vergeleek hij het institutionaliseren van de Oekraïense taal en cultuur zelfs met “massavernietigingswapens”. De metafoor uitbreidend, vervolgt hij: “Zo’n ruwe, kunstmatige tweedeling tussen Russen en Oekraïners kan de totale Russische bevolking met honderdduizenden, of zelfs miljoenen, hebben doen afnemen.”

In one very real sense, the current war in Ukraine is about language. Vladimir Putin has presented the defense of Russian-speakers in Ukraine as justification for a campaign of cultural and political domination. In an article posted to the Kremlin website last July, he went so far as to compare the institutionalizing of Ukrainian language and culture to “weapons of mass destruction.” Extending the metaphor, he continues: “Such a crude, artificial dichotomy between Russians and Ukrainians may have caused the total Russian population to decrease by hundreds of thousands, or even millions.”

This accusation is no less chilling for its absurdity: Ukraine, the argument goes, has robbed Russia of ethnic Russians by compelling them to speak Ukrainian. This cultural shift from Russian towards Ukrainian is what Putin seems to mean when he evokes the term genocide, as a perverse pretext for the mass killing of Ukrainian civilians. (Literary Hub April 8  2022)

‘Niets heeft het Oekraïense volk zo verenigd rond een enkele taal als de aanval van Rusland op zijn soevereiniteit. In een in 2017 gepubliceerd artikel stelde de politicoloog Volodymyr Kulyk vast dat na de annexatie van de Krim in 2014 en het uitbreken van de Donbas-oorlog meer mensen in heel Oekraïne “willen dat de staat helpt de Oekraïense taal op grotere schaal te gebruiken, in overeenstemming met zowel zijn wettelijke status als zijn symbolische rol als de nationale taal.” Afgelopen januari 2022, toen Russische troepen zich opmaakten voor een invasie, nam Oekraïne een taalwet aan die verplichtte Oekraïens te gebruiken in officiële contexten, waaronder scholen.’ (ibidem)

Aan het eind van de 19e eeuw was het vrijwel onmogelijk geworden Oekraïense literatuur te publiceren. De Valuev Doctrine van 1863 en de daaropvolgende Ems Ukase van 1873 verboden de publicatie van de meeste literatuur in het Oekraïens. Dichters als Lesia Ukrainka moesten in Galicië worden gepubliceerd, toen nog in het Habsburgse Rijk, en hun werk moest naar het tsaristische Rusland worden gesmokkeld. Veel schrijvers en geleerden in West-Oekraïne legden volksliederen en toespraken van boeren vast als een manier om de taal en cultuur te behouden.

Laten we de taal eren, zij het dan in vertaling, door op de mooie teksten van de dichteres Kateryna Kalytko in te zoemen. Haar teksten lezen vaak als liefdeslyriek aan de Oekraïense taal. Ongeneerd roepen ze de liefde op om de passie van het geheugen uit te leggen, het verkennen van de cultuur, aldus Amelia Glaser.

Kateryna Kalytko is a poet, prose writer, and translator. She has published nine collections of poetry and books of short stories. She has received many literary awards and fellowships, among them the Central European Initiative Fellowship for Writers in Residence, KulturKontakt Austria, Reading Balkans, Vilenica Crystal Award, Joseph Conrad-Korzeniowski Literary Prize, BBC Book of the year and Women in Arts Award from UN Women. Striking imagery emerges in her recent poetry like puzzle pieces that create a violent and shocking picture of war, conveying the loss and pain that is experienced during a search for safety and identity amidst the war.
To love in a time of war is
to wear earrings in spite of everything,
so the holes don’t close,
the ones you pierced with Grandma
at the old beauty parlor.

The darning needle punctures
the pink baby flesh still
untouched by trauma.
The sound with which the needle slowly
breaks through
is too soft to call
a crunch or a crack,
but it’s there.
Why isn’t she crying?—The hairdresser
looks at Grandma.
—She isn’t going to cry,—
Grandma answers
Liefhebben in een tijd van oorlog is
oorbellen te dragen ondanks alles,
zodat de gaatjes niet dichtgroeien,
die je met oma hebt gepierced
in het oude schoonheidssalon.

De stopnaald prikt
het roze baby-vlees nog steeds
onaangetast door trauma.
Het geluid waarmee de naald langzaam
doorbreekt
is te zacht om het een
een knak of een krak te noemen,
maar het is er.
Waarom huilt ze niet? De kapster
kijkt naar oma.
-Ze gaat niet huilen,-
antwoordt oma 

“Ondanks de hele prachtige erfenis van de Oekraïense literatuur, hebben we nog steeds niet genoeg woorden om te beschrijven wat er nu met ons gebeurt
In addition to her original poetry of war, Kalytko has translated Croatian and Bosnian poets of the Balkan war. At thirty-nine, she has published nine books of poetry of fiction, which have won prizes in Ukraine and internationally. The language of her poetry informs her prose. Her 2019 collection, Nobody knows us here and we are nobody, for example, combines poems and poetic vignettes, many of which describe the disorienting feeling of internal displacement.(Amelia Glaser)
Here, take this language, woman,
Use it to shoot.
Defend yourself to your last breath—and whatever you do
don’t let them near you. Use
the radio interception system
and the night vision riflescope.
These are included. And don’t pretend you don’t know how to use it.
Keep your eye trained
on the enemy’s location and on his slightest advance.
Let him come within shooting range—then strike the target and
don’t hesitate.
There are plenty of bullets, don’t spare them,
if they run out—
make new ones out of words,
only slender feminine fingers are suited to such maneuvers.
And come what may, don’t let them near
the old border, where father’s plums lie ripe and heavy.
When they cross it—you must confront them, hand to hand.
Then pierce them with your bayonet, slit them ear to ear,
slash, smash, and scalp them
until the light dims before your eyes.
When you wake up, you’ll stroke the prickly nape
of your recruit-son, hand your husband his crutches,
and then, you’ll start over.
Who said we left you to your fate?
We’ve armed you as best we could.

(–Translated from the Ukrainian by Amelia Glaser and Yuliya Ilchuk. )

But these things happen:
heroes have died, enemies survive,
and people, regular people, neither one nor the other,
string and scatter the beads of happiness—
celebrating love, somebody’s birthday,
A house-warming party,
while you’ve filled an earth pie with your flesh.
The planets haven’t ceased their orbit,
even the trams haven’t changed their schedules.
Outside the hospital window there’s a construction site,
hammering stakes, knocking like distant artillery,
and a boy, grasping a piece of rebar, hits it against the asphalt,
the way a night rail worker hits the wheels of the train,
that you ride in oblivion across the whole country,
falling hard, your belly sticking in the earth pie,
that’s been stuffed to the brim with people.

–Translated from the Ukrainian by Amelia Glaser and Yuliya Ilchuk. 
Maar deze dingen gebeuren:
helden zijn gestorven, vijanden overleven,
en mensen, gewone mensen, noch het een, noch het ander,
rijgen en strooien de kralen van geluk-
de liefde vieren, iemands verjaardag,
Een house-warming party,
terwijl je een aardse taart hebt gevuld met je vlees.
De planeten zijn niet gestopt met hun baan,
zelfs de trams hebben hun dienstregeling niet veranderd.
Buiten het ziekenhuis raam is er een bouwplaats,
hamerende palen, kloppend als verre artillerie,
en een jongen, grijpt een stuk betonijzer, slaat het tegen het asfalt,
zoals een nachtspoorwegwerker tegen de wielen van de trein slaat,
die je in vergetelheid door het hele land rijdt,
hard vallend, je buik stekend in de aarde-taart,
die tot de rand toe gevuld is met mensen
They asked Passiflora for her passport at the entrance to the garden,
but she didn’t have one.
What she had was a thorny and knotted stalk of sorrow,
and a flower with a full array of passions, nails in stigmata,
a crown of thorns, but no passport.
Where are you taking all this pain, it’s contraband,—
they ask with jeering smiles;
They’re probably mocking me,—she thinks quietly.
The fog lifts from the river channel, making it so homeless.
In the garden sturdy apple trees are weighed down, resting their branches on the earth,
like runners at the starting line.
You can hear the delicate peony dropping its flower, petal by petal, to the grass.
A bit further, an intrepid army of currants, raspberries,
And a stray ivy, having crept in through the backdoor, pushes them from the wall.
But she was seeking a gate that barred access to her alone.
Well what can I do, she says, I’m sorry, I’ll just wait here;
She clutched a stone and has held on for five years,
her blue eyes blossoming, bearing heart-shaped fruits.

–Translated, from the Ukrainian by Amelia Glaser and Yilia Ilchuk-
Ze vroegen Passiflora om haar paspoort bij de ingang van de tuin,
maar dat had ze niet.
Wat ze had was een doornige en geknoopte stengel van verdriet,
en een bloem met een hele reeks passies, nagels in stigmata,
een doornenkroon, maar geen paspoort.
Waar haal je al die pijn vandaan, het is smokkelwaar,-
vragen ze met een spottende glimlach;
Ze bespotten me waarschijnlijk,- denkt ze stilletjes.
De mist trekt op uit het rivierkanaal, waardoor het zo dakloos wordt.
In de tuin staan stevige appelbomen, hun takken rustend op de aarde,
als hardlopers aan de startlijn.
Je hoort de tere pioenroos haar bloem, bloemblaadje voor bloemblaadje, op het gras laten vallen.
Een beetje verder, een onverschrokken leger van aalbessen, frambozen,
En een verdwaalde klimop, die door de achterdeur naar binnen is geslopen, duwt ze van de muur.
Maar ze was op zoek naar een poort die alleen voor haar de toegang versperde.
Nu wat kan ik doen, zegt ze, het spijt me, ik zal hier gewoon wachten;
Ze greep een steen vast en heeft het vijf jaar volgehouden,
haar blauwe ogen bloeiden, hartvormige vruchten dragend.
Kateryna Kalytko is a poet, prose writer, and translator. She has published nine collections of poetry and books of short stories. She has received many literary awards and fellowships, among them the Central European Initiative Fellowship for Writers in Residence, KulturKontakt Austria, Reading Balkans, Vilenica Crystal Award, Joseph Conrad-Korzeniowski Literary Prize, BBC Book of the year and Women in Arts Award from UN Women. Striking imagery emerges in her recent poetry like puzzle pieces that create a violent and shocking picture of war, conveying the loss and pain that is experienced during a search for safety and identity amidst the war.

Amelia Glaser is Associate Professor of Russian and Comparative Literature at U.C. San Diego. She is the author of Jews and Ukrainians in Russia’s Literary Borderlands (2012) and Songs in Dark Times: Yiddish Poetry of Struggle from Scottsboro to Palestine (2020). She is currently a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.

Yuliya Ilchuk is Assistant Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures at Stanford University. She is the author of Nikolai Gogol: Performing Hybrid Identity (2021). She is currently researching memory and identity in post-Soviet Russian and Ukrainian literature.

Oorspronkelijke versie in het boeiende magazine: Literary Hub, ten zeerste aan te raden.

Geef een reactie

Vul je gegevens in of klik op een icoon om in te loggen.

WordPress.com logo

Je reageert onder je WordPress.com account. Log uit /  Bijwerken )

Twitter-afbeelding

Je reageert onder je Twitter account. Log uit /  Bijwerken )

Facebook foto

Je reageert onder je Facebook account. Log uit /  Bijwerken )

Verbinden met %s

Deze site gebruikt Akismet om spam te bestrijden. Ontdek hoe de data van je reactie verwerkt wordt.